An analysis of the destructors and the wormsley common gang

In his hands, power is the ability to lead others. The series included thirteen episodes.

The Destructors

Blackie initially holds the power of leadership in the gang, and he is a basically good leader. For on that occasion, Satan, mingling himself with the waters of the Tigris to escape the notice of the guardians now aware of his first entry, slips under the wall of the garden.

This house is owned by Mr. Greene often offers the possibility of redemption somewhere within the work.

How does the Wormsley Common Gang represent humanity in Graham Greene's story

But few writers, if any, now regard apocalypse as the end of human history. In his hands, power is the ability to lead others. In the s and s, novelists such as Greene wrote traditional fiction that was well-crafted enough both to stand up to innovative fiction of the day and to gain a wide and loyal audience.

Blackie suspects that T. The image of worms is picked up later in the story as Trevor explains the manner in which the gang would destroy Mr. His works are popular with critics and readers; they have been translated into twenty-seven languages and have sold over twenty million copies.

He wraps himself in the blanket and eats the buttered penny buns the boys have given him. Known as teddy boys, these groups of boys banded together in the name of delinquency and destruction.

The Destructors

Old Misery accosts Mike, Blackie, and Summers as he returns from a trip to the market: After everyone but Blackie has left, T.

Thomas by the boys suggests not only the personal emotional state of the old man but also the unpleasant aspect of English traditions built on privilege and class distinctions—the old misery inflicted on the masses by the conservative ruling classes.

Mike has always been easily surprised and gullible; when he was nine, he believed someone who told him that if he did not keep his mouth shut, he would get a frog in it.

The Destructors Summary

As the ash from the burning notes falls on their heads, Trevor says: Address the following quotation in the story by explaining its context and overall significance to the story: By the end of the story, however, he realizes that he was terribly misguided. In any case, it is not with the destructors.

By the end of the day, the house is in shambles: Christian civilization, a system of belief in which a unifying providential principle has been immanent, is, like all systems, finally a human construct and subject to the debilitating effects of time.

The house is clearly an architectural and historical wonder, an enduring remnant of a bygone era when such buildings were the careful work of artistic craftsmen.

The Destructors Summary

Thomas, nothing to live in but his loo. Active Themes The next day T. In the Catholic Church, there is always grace by which a sinner can receive redemption.

The house that once stood with such dignity among the bombed-out ruins has disappeared. Thomas stands for the old ways and the past belief in the authority of elders. It is a dreary August; dark bomb-sites surround the Common. Their leader up until the events narrated in the story is a boy named Blackie, who claims to have heard the sound of destruction when the bombs fall even though he would have been too young to remember it.

Blackie, then, is the most promising character in terms of redemption. The First Reform Act of seriously called into question the privileged status of the aristocracy. Critics often comment on the story within the historical context of the postwar era in England. He is on a path that will only lead to more cruelty against other people, and his lack of remorse suggests that he is unaware that he should even be thinking about redemption.

An anonymous and representative voice of the gang responds: Known as teddy boys, these groups of boys banded together in the name of delinquency and destruction. Things are falling apart; the age is apocalyptic. Their leader up until the events narrated in the story is a boy named Blackie, who claims to have heard the sound of destruction when the bombs fall even though he would have been too young to remember it.In "The Destructors," T.

becomes fascinated with a stately old house that has somehow survived the bombings of WWII. When T. gains entry to the house, he convinces the members of his ragtag gang. The Destructors Short Story Analysis This short story written by Graham Greene depicts a group of teenage boys, who call themselves the Wormsley Common Gang, after an area where they lived in.

"The Destructors" is set in one of the poorest regions in London, Wormsley Common. In Wormsley Common is a group of teenage boys, known as the Wormsley Common gang. Near Wormsley Common is an old house, a relic of the eighteenth century, owned by a man named Thomas, also known as Old Misery to the Wormsley Common gang.

Trevor is the lead character of “The Destructors," a short story by Graham Greene first published in Trevor is a part of the Wormsley Common Gang, a group of teenage boys who create mischief in the Wormsley Common neighborhood. "The Destructors" is set in one of the poorest regions in London, Wormsley Common.

In Wormsley Common is a group of teenage boys, known as the Wormsley Common gang. Near Wormsley Common is an old house, a relic of the eighteenth century, owned by a man named Thomas, also known as Old Misery to the Wormsley Common gang.

The Destructors Short Story Analysis This short story written by Graham Greene depicts a group of teenage boys, who call themselves the Wormsley Common Gang, after an area where they lived in.

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An analysis of the destructors and the wormsley common gang
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